Electronics: The Bigger Picture

In our exploration of electronics, we started at the atomic level with the fundamental properties of subatomic particles. We looked at emergent properties of collections of atoms, like the origins of chemical bonding and electronic behavior of materials. Recently we have started to move up in scale, seeing that individual circuit components affect the flow and storage of electrons in different ways. At this point I think it is worthwhile to take a step back and look at the larger picture. While individual electrons are governed by local interactions that minimize energy, we can figure out global rules for a circuit component that tell us how collections of electrons are affected by a resistor or some other building block, creating the macroscopic quantity we call current. From there we can create collections of circuit components that perform various operations on the current passing through them. These operations can again be combined, and where we may have started with a simple switch, we can end up with a computer or a display or a control circuit.

One way to picture it is like a complex canal system for water: we have a resource whose movement we want to manipulate, to extract physical work and perhaps perform calculations. At a small scale, we can inject dye into a bit of water and watch its progress through the system as it responds to local forces. But we can look at water currents at a larger scale by adding up the behavior of many small amounts of water. In fact, scale is a type of context, a lens through which a system can look quite different! Electrical engineers who design complex circuits for a living tend to work at a much higher level of abstraction than do scientists working on experimental electronic devices. The electrical engineers have to be able to imagine and simulate the function of impressive numbers of transistors, resistors, and other components, as shown below. Whereas a device physicist focuses on the detailed physics in a single circuit component, to learn what its best use might be. They are each working with the same system, but in different and complementary ways.

When I first started writing here, I talked about science as a lens through which we can view the world: a set of perspectives that let us see the things around us in a different way than we are used to. But there are lots of different worldviews and perspectives within science, depending on scale as well as other contexts. A discussion of electrical current, for example, could be handled quite differently depending on whether electrons are moving through a polar solvent like water, or synapses in the brain, or a metal wire connecting a capacitor to an inductor. Scientists who have trained in different fields like physics, chemistry, or biology can imagine very different contexts for discussions of the same phenomenon, so that even when the fundamental science is the same, the narrative and implications may change between contexts.

But in the end, whether you are a scientist or just interested in science, it helps to know not only that an electron is a tiny charged particle, but also how it behaves in electronic circuits, in chemical bonds between atoms, and in biological systems. And to know that it’s possible to build computers out of gears, billiard balls, or even crabs! But the size and properties of electronic computers have led them to dominate, at least for now.

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4 responses to “Electronics: The Bigger Picture

  1. A crab computer…
    Now that would be cool.

  2. In chemistry, physics, and biology, while electron motions are involved, it seems that these motions are modulated in very different ways. For instance, in neurons there are electrical currents but these currents are mediated by Ca, K, and Na pumps and by dynamic modulation of the surrounding resistors. There are also complex nanometer scale amplifiers. I hope that you eventually discuss the similarities and differences between electrical currents in these fields not just as the macroscopic level but at the nanometer level.

  3. Pingback: Defects in the Crystal Structure of Materials | letstalkaboutscience

  4. Pingback: Topic Index | letstalkaboutscience

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